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Full text of "Rapid Population Growth Consequences And Policy Implications"

(Price-weighted indices, world1 average for all food, 1948-52= 100)
							
1934-38						.................. !	
							
North America    1953-57							J
						._	
1963-65							
							r
1334-38					............. i		
							
Oceania     1953-57					:.;::;i		
							
1963-65					i		
							
1934-38				,Z3			
							
Western Europe     1953-57				........ )			
							
1963-65					3		
							
							
TOTAL:                          1934-38					P		
							
Three regions above       1953-57					..: ...... .1		
							
1963-65					..... :   .3		
TOTAL:                          1934-38 Four regions below         1953-57 1963-65	________ 1	s					
							
							
1934-38		.....    1					
							
Latin America     1953-57							
							
1963-65							
							
1934-38		............ J					
							
Near East    1953-57		:.::::::]					
							
1963-65							
1934-38 Africa    1953-57 1963-65	_________ 1	3 3 3					
1934-38	.................... 1						
							
Far East2     1953-57							
							
1963-65							
							
0               50             100            150             200            250            300             350
1.  Excluding USSR, eastern Europe, and mainland China.
2.  Excluding mainland China.
Figure 1.  Estimated values of food supplies per capita by world regions, 1930's 1960's.
Sources:  (5, 6). application of technology and management in countries at early stages of development. If the less developed countries could attain the yields in basic crops already achieved in North America, Europe, and Japan, the much larger world population at the end of the century could be provided with an adequate supply of calories. If the future levels of yields in the less developed countries equalled those expected in the developed countries, the LDC's would have grains above their requirements for food. This grain surplus could then be a source of more proteins if used for animal feed. Additional increases in output may be secured by cultivating new lands, particularly in Africa and South America, but this is generally less promising than better cultivation as a source of additional food.se of projecting resource demands by major world regions. Based on the most recent high population projections of the United Nations (3.295 billion in 1965 projected to 4.551 billion in 1980 and 6.994 billion in 2000), our rough estimates of the materials which would be consumed in the year 2000 were made under each of the following assumptions: